Posts Tagged carlos tevez

During the Week: of Shocks, Withdrawals, Tax Evaders & More


In a week that witnessed more withdrawals from it than bank customers at an ATM (please don’t sue me), Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer must be wondering how it would have been better to be on the withdrawal bandwagon rather than suffering rare and embarrassing defeats.

First was world number five Nadal, brimming with a champion’s confidence having just won his favourite Grand Slam, the French Open, a record eighth time on the back of losing just two matches since making a return from a long term knee injury, fell to a player ranked 130 places below him at that point… worse still, in straight sets.

Steve Darcis’ shock 7-6 (7-4) 7-6 (10-8) 6-4 win in the first round paved way for an equally shocking defeat in the second round as world number two Roger Federer, after winning the first set, ended up losing 6-7 (5-7) 7-6 (7-5) 7-5 7-6 to 116th ranked Sergiy Stakhovsky.

And to make their losses as frustrating as humanly possible, Darcis withdrew from Wimbledon with a shoulder problem (side effects of beating a hard hitter like Nadal) while Stakhovsky, in the very next round after beating Federer, lost 6-2 2-6 7-5 6-3 to Jurgen Melzer. Would Melzer have beaten Federer? We’ll never know.

The shock losses spilled into the women’s section with third seed Maria Sharapova losing in straight sets of 6-3 6-4 to Michelle Larcher De Brito while French Open semifinalist Sara Errani was bundled out earlier in the first round.

Those shock exits, coupled with the withdrawals of Jo Wilfred Tsonga (who was down two sets to one when he did, go figure), Marin Cilic, Radek Stepanek and John Isner in the male section as well as Viktoria Azarenka in the female means that – much as they would want you to believe otherwise – the path to the final is much less perilous than originally would have been (at least on paper) for top seeds Novak Djokovic and Serena Williams as well as Britain’s shining hope Andy Murray… maybe David Ferrer too.

As to claims that the playing surface is to blame for the diluge of withdrawals, organisers of the third slam on the calendar stated “The factual evidence, which is independently checked, is that the courts are almost identical to last year, as dry and firm as they should be, and we expect them to continue to play to their usual high quality”. Simply put, ‘quit whining and get on with it’.

So we move on from the grass surface of SW19 to the grass at Brazil where Spain will face the host nation in the final of the FIFA Confederations Cup after edging out the Italians 7-6 on (well taken) penalties following a goalless 120 mnutes; much better than last time both met at the final of the Euros last year where the Spaniards ran out 4-0 winners.

This final, which is the very fixture anticipated by all from the start of the Confederations Cup, will be a major test of how good or otherwise the Brazilian team is ahead of next summer’s World Cup just as it would inevitably serve as a stage to see what Neymar can pull off against pretty much the players he will play with and against when La Liga kicks off for the 2013/14 season.

As for Spain, it’s a chance to fare much better than the third place finish they managed at the last Confederations Cup in South Africa as well as extend an unbeaten run of matches that has been since November 2011 when England beat them in a friendly.

Spanish fans will also be looking out for their U20 national side vying for the World Youth Championship in Turkey, having just made the first knockout round there by finishing top of Group A with nine maximum points ahead of France, Ghana (who have a slim chance of qualifying as one of the best third placed countries) and the United States.

Nigeria’s Flying Eagles are also through to the knockout round after finishing Group B in second place with six points, a point behind Portugal, after beating South Korea by a lone goal in their final group match on Thursday. And as it stands, Nigeria may well be the only African nation left competing after the final round of group matches in Groups E and F are played later today.

For one, Egypt, without a point, need a big win against England in Group E to either qualify or at least keep England from doing so for Ghana’s sake, just as Uruguay must be beaten by table topping Uzbekistan in Group F to aid Ghana’s cause while also sealing their (the Uzbek’s) qualification.

Murky, twisted situation that but no where as murky as Silvio Berlusconi’s situation with the law in Italy, after a ruling by three judges in a case of sleeping with an underaged girl found him guilty, sentenced him to seven years in prison and also banned him from partaking in politics… but there’s a catch.

Apparently, Berlusconi, who is the owner of Serie A giants AC Milan, was sentenced to four years in prison last year after being convicted of tax evasion but hasn’t served a minute in prison. Why? An appeal process must be completed in both cases (yes, the man has appealed) and due to the multiple stages involved in the appeal process, it could take years before being settled.

Hence, Berlusconi may well never serve jail time for his convictions. Lionel Messi on his part, would also likely not serve jail time over the tax evasion allegations levelled against him recently in Spanish court after agreeing to pay an amount between €15m and €21m to the tax authorities there. So not only are the Spaniards winning on the field of play, they also are in the court and more so against a No. 10 touted as the best ever. Tough world.

Likely tougher for those who will face Juventus next season, especially in the Serie A, after the league champions completed the deal to bring Argentine forward Carlos Tevez over from oil rich Manchester City in a £7.6m steal that could rise to £12m… still a steal of a deal for Juve.

Other players that have or will be moving include Andrei Arshavin who returned to Zenit St. Petersburg after the expiration of his contract at Arsenal, goalkeeper Simon Mignolet who joined Liverpool from Sunderland, Chelsea’s Marko Marin who will spend next season on loan at Sevilla, Lille’s Dimitri Payet who will sign for Olympique Marseille next week and Isco who will be Carlo Ancelotti’s first signing (per se) from sorry Malaga.

Malaga have now lost manager Manuel Pellegrini to Manchester City and Isco to Real right after losing Santi Cazorla and Nacho Monreal to Arsenal in the last year. Heap on the ban from UEFA competitions due to not meeting certain Financial Fair Play regulations and you can’t but feel sorry for a modest side that made the Champions League quarterfinals last season.

A bit of sympathy too for Red Bull driver Mark Webber who announced during the week that he would quit Formula 1 at the end of this season to join Porsche’s new sportscar programme and will compete at the LeMans 24 hour race with them.

Webber had been in the midst of a controversial team ‘bust-up’ this season, when teammate and world champion Sebastien Vettel ignored team orders and overtook Webber at the Malaysian grand prix. Vettel apologised soon after, only to then state that he would do same if both drivers were in the same situation again.

While Webber would deny that incident isn’t responsible for his decision to quit the sport, all indications point to it really, more so after it was confirmed that he received offers from at least one top team to join them next season. For the moment, that’s about it with the roundup from the week.

On this day in 1880, France annexed Tahiti and probably annexed every ounce of the latter’s footballing talents along. And in 2007, Apple Inc. released its first mobile phone, the iPhone.

Happy birthday to gospel singer Don Moen (63), pop singer Nicole Scherzinger (35), Argentine football midfielder Ever Banega (25), French football midfielder Yann M’Vila (23) and the young doctor Obinna Nnewuihe (20-I really can’t tell you). Best wishes to him and everyone else celebrating today.

Have a pleasant day wherever this post meets you.

Advertisements

, , , , , , ,

2 Comments

The Rich Also Cry Mancini


It’s all fun and games until the City starts to fall apart and Manchester City may well need to check its excesses before it self-destructs owing ironically to its most potent weapon, near limitless wealth. Having been bought over by Sheikh Mansour, Manchester City has transformed into a feared adversary in the transfer market especially and more importantly on the pitch, though the latter remains arguable.

In any case, the oil riches have elevated City from mid-table obscurity under the likes of Steve McLaren and Sven Goran Eriksson to the lucrative top quarter of the league as well as Champions League football courtesy of its 3rd place finishing last season. This, coupled with high profile players being signed at will and pampered with wages pushing the line of absurd, certainly the club’s stature has improved surreally.

All that could however lead the club back to obscurity, given a more celebrated one, what with the pampered players such as Carlos Tevez and more recently Mario Balotteli giving the world a peek into the illusion that clouds the air at the Eastlands. Unfortunately, rather than trim its excesses, it may well be a fine manager in Roberto Mancini that will bear the repercussions while the brats stay on.

Mancini is known for being an excellent manager especially when it comes to resource management if I may put it that way. The Italian, since his managerial debut with Fiorentina, holds a record of reaching at least the semi-final of a Cup competition in every season he has managed a club. This includes Coppa Italia triumphs – in his only year at Fiorentina, at Lazio as well as four consecutive times at Inter Milan – as well as reaching the UEFA Cup semi-final with Lazio and winning the FA Cup last season at City.

Therefore his managerial abilities, tactic wise, remains very sound in my opinion but the other side of his abilities is in question. I believe Mancini’s main problem is being exposed to an obscene amount as transfer budget right after six seasons managing in a debt-riddled Serie A. He left Fiorentina with the club then perilously close to bankruptcy, Lazio was heavy in debt in the two otherwise successful seasons he spent at Rome and Inter Milan’s finances can be described as secure when he reigned at the San Siro and became their greatest manager in three decades with a complete lock down of the Italian league and cup titles.

So being able to thrive with little resources, Mancini was employed under the assumption he would properly manage a complete opposite of what he is used to. Alas, it has been a mess so far off the pitch and the level of ego at a club that pays at least £140,000 weekly to at least seven first team players with six more not far behind in earning at least £90,000 weekly leaves much to desire when it comes to the individuals being a team.

Egos then will see more players than not advocating to be left untouched in the first eleven at all times, some for all 90 minutes at all times even as Balotteli’s attitude seems, leaving dear old Mancini with the headache of what to do with; for example, his front line that at the moment comprises unsettled Carlos Tevez and Emmanuel Adebayor, Edin Dzeko, Balotteli and new arrival Sergio Aguero without forgetting David Silva…

From the above, Adebayor can be left out seeing as he is determined to force a move away, one less source of migraine for Mancini there. And moving on, one may argue having good depth but there are times, a lot of times, when it is individual brilliance that rescues City from an embarrassing situation in a match as Tevez, Yaya Toure and maybe Silva can testify from last season’s performances. City surely can’t hope this would be the case all the time.

And in all this, Mancini still wants to add two players to the squad as quoted to stating last week and you start to wonder if there is a script at City…

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Comments

EPL Players of the Season 2010/11


Javier Hernandez

Javier Hernandez

Javier Hernandez, the little pea in the big league

Snapped up from Chivas Guadalajara just before a commendable World Cup campaign in South Africa for Mexico, ‘Chicharito’ arrived Old Trafford, scored 13 goals in 21 league appearances and made such an impact at the Theatre of Dreams that Dimitar Berbatov’s long overdue return on goals for the money spent on him could not save him from losing his first team place to the diminutive Mexican.

Peter Osaze Odemwingie
Mostly condemned for moving to a club of Westbromwich-Albion’s stature by fans back in Nigeria and abused racially for leaving Lokomotiv Moscow by fans of the Russian club, Osaze went about his business and his sterling performances for the Baggies through the season; bagging 15 goals along the way, was more than enough to silence his critics and announce his talents to the English game. Being named PFA Player of the Month twice added good icing to his cake.

Robin van Persie
This Dutchman’s form for Arsenal, laden as always with time on the sidelines due to injury, deserved a trophy but just like his goal in the Carling Cup final against Birmingham City, it simply didn’t prove enough. Van Persie however should be proud of his individual performances this season having finished with 18 league goals this season; the first of those scored on New Year’s Day, equalling the record held by Cristiano Ronaldo and former teammate Thierry Henry for most goals scored between January and season’s end. He also shot his way to breaking Didier Drogba’s record of scoring in six consecutive away league matches by scoring in nine consecutive away league matches.

Luka Modric

Luka Modric

Luka Modric (Spurs' engine) would be the player in the background with both arms raised, with Van der Vaart (Spurs' sleek exterior) celebrating in the fore

Where Rafael van Der Vaart was the sleek outer design of the Tottenham Hotspur team, Croatian playmaker Modric was the engine under the hood that truly ran the show with space-opening passes, playing self and team out of trouble and providing the occasional assist. Modric indeed is the unsung star of Tottenham this season and you just feel a far less calamitous goalkeeper and more consistent forwards will see the top echelon of the Premier League be even more competitive.

Darren Bent

After leaving Sunderland in January the dearth in goal became obvious at the Stadium of Light, much to the benefit of Aston Villa where between the New Year and March he became top scorer of the Villans with 10 goals in 16 league appearances; including two in a memorable win at Arsenal at on the penultimate weekend of the season

Wayne Rooney
All he needs is a moment to show why every opposition defender is ever unsettled when Rooney appears on the starting sheet of Manchester United on any given weekend and weekday. Every season his game improves steady and his scoring touch has remained at a good level for a forward, his team play has improved tremendously and it’s when the team performs that managers are happy; individual performances come as added bonus really.

Leighton Baines

Leighton Baines

Leighton Baines played in all of Everton's league matches this season, scoring five while at it

Everton would be better off in the league had the club attained same level of consistency as Baines. His occasional goals and high return on assists only bettered by Cesc Fabregas and Didier Drogba (according to Opta Sports) along with assured performances week after week for all 38 league matches amazingly, deservedly earned him the club’s Player of the Season, Players’ Player of the Season as well as Goal of the Season.

Jack Wilshere
Bolton Wanderers had a request to have the teenage English midfielder back on loan at the Reebok Stadium rejected few days to the start of the season and it proved to an invaluable decision by Arsène Wenger as evident by a consistent return of stellar individual performances for Arsenal all through the 49 matches he played in all competitions; one that deserved a trophy as reward… one that eluded the team.

Gareth Bale
Most unfortunately for the Three Lions of England, Bale is Welsh. A fact that made his explosive form for Tottenham Hotspur one worthy of much praise and enough for him to win the PFA Player of the Year although… winning that accolade was perhaps a bit of a hasty decision from the Queens’ men.

Edwin van Der Sar

Edwin van der Sar

Edwin van der Sar saving Anelka's spot kick in the 2008 Champions League final

This here is a Dutchman that has tasted the highs (Ajax) and endured the lows (Juventus and at Fulham; no offence to the Cottagers) of football hence retiring on a high at Manchester United after a top quality season of performances in all competitions is just what van Der Sar derseves. Van Der Save earned that nickname with string of saves that belied his 41 years and hopefully the Red Devils won’t go through the conundrum of finding a replacement like it did after Peter Scheimichel retired.

Rafael Van Der Vaart

Rafael van Der Vaart

Rafael van Der Vaart applauding Spurs' fans after a match

Following in the individual steps of countrymen Arjen Robben and Wesley Sneijder… out of Real Madrid, van der Vaart added a bit more flair to the game of Tottenham Hotspur, culminated in his 13 goals in 28 league appearances for the Lilywhites and a commendable campaign for the club; one that saw Spurs reach the Champions League quarterfinals in its maiden appearance in the competition.

Ryan Giggs

Ageless Welshman has now won one less league trophies than Arsenal has in its history. If that does not hit you enough in the face, think of it this way; only three clubs in all of England has won more league titles than he has… and the picture should be settling in now. Even at the ripe age of 37 when it is goalkeepers that attain their peak, Giggs proved very instrumental in Manchester United’s title winning campaign with his experience coming in handy and the evidence of speed in him still that belies his age. This here is a Welshman that has got better with age.

And others worthy of making this list fall below:

Didier Drogba

Samir Nasri

Charlie Adam

Antonio Valencia

Dirk Kuyt

Nemanja Vidic

Brede Hangeland

Nani

Charles N’Zogbia

Carlos Tevez

Yaya Toure

Dimitar Berbatov

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: